The heart-warming bromance between Pline and Saros

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The heart-warming bromance between Pline and Saros

Russ Pline (left) and Jason Saros (right) have fun in between class.

Russ Pline (left) and Jason Saros (right) have fun in between class.

Angela Voit

Russ Pline (left) and Jason Saros (right) have fun in between class.

Angela Voit

Angela Voit

Russ Pline (left) and Jason Saros (right) have fun in between class.

Angela Voit, Staff Reporter

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Have you ever been walking down upper D-hall to see two old chums having a grand ol’ time? Often found standing right outside room D232 are a circle of elite mathematicians and their kings: Russell Pline (Math) and top dog Jason Saros (Math) – the kind of buddies that when witnessed make you think, ‘Maybe I’ve never had any friends.’
“Well, you know, I never really noticed as a freshman with Saros, but as I became a student of Pline it became truly apparent. My freshman year I just noticed Saros gone now and then and I’d wonder, ‘Hmm, where has he gone?’” Jaclyn Wang (11), a student of both, said. “When I would go visit Saros just because I missed him, Pline would also come in and he would boost me away. I get it. There’s a hierarchy and [their friendship] is higher than my friendship with Saros … it’s something to aspire to.”
Most Algebra II Honors students are introduced to Pline as the Final Tester. This is the man who knows what is coming that fateful day of finals week. This is the man who looked at the grade ruining exam and went, ‘Yes, this seems okay.’
“What’s reasonable to them is terrifying for [lesser beings]…but if it means they get more quality time together I’m all for it,” Jaclyn explained when questioned on the effectiveness of this activity.
She recognizes that these cronies sure do love working together.
“I respect [Saros] on both a professional and personal level,” Pline said, “He helps everybody in our department.”
Not only do they collaborate in math, but they exchange car and motorbike advice.
“Besides generous and kind and, I mean, overall a good person, I don’t have much more,” Saros said of Pline.
Rachel Lee (11) described in depth how all happiness is fleeting and most friendships fade to conclude that theirs could be from kindergarten. Pline clarified that they became friends when he started his job here.
Sophia Lee (11) feels like the relationship may be a little forced as they are both math teachers, but on occasion she sees them walk into a teacher lounge with their little lunch boxes, and once her cake pops, and she appreciates that.
When Sophia is anxiously awaiting the start of a test and Saros walks in post-bell, as a result decreasing her total test time, she feels this is okay. She says he is efficient and works hard.
“Sometimes you gotta give back to get back,” she said.
Saros deserves a life outside of math. This is the gift his students give to him.
“It’s maybe a minute delay,” Pline added.
But what is that they are discussing, calling them back together day after day, hour after hour? Sophia believes they may discuss her fantastic work or my overly clingy behavior, which like I originally took offense to but after deep personal reflection saw the irony of my situation.
Rachel claims it is math teacher gossip while Jaclyn thinks it may be playdate planning and bonding over their mutual dad-ness. She would like it to be clarified that she hates children.
Pline claims the topics range from math to cars to Seinfeld, but without hot τ(ea) what does Saros make the Odyssean trip down the hall for? Are they truly just that great of friends?
“We are required by the high school to stand in hallways during passing time,” Pline explained.
Wait. Does this mean the bond may not be as strong as previously thought?
Convinced that this may be one of the greatest bromances of history, Sophia’s BC Calc class suffered a great shock when Saros shared his stance on the sum and difference of cubes. After repeatedly being told by Pline that they should know it, Saros off-handedly mentioned that it doesn’t really come up that much.
Many in the class gasped. Could it be? Could they really disagree so greatly on something so near and dear to Pline’s very being?
After a further questioning of Pline and Saros, I learned that in fact everything may be okay. Saros’s position is that you should have the skills to figure it out while Pline agreed. Everyone must be relieved.
One day, when trying to hit the zombie on the head using derivatives to find the tangent line, we all may hope to find the guidance in our partner to catch our mistakes as they fall tumbling through the crack between our two brain cells. Pline and Saros stand together as they teach each set of students one year at of time and then pass them on to each other. Somehow they have remained okay with this collaboration. Pline’s words best summed up the experience of being in any friendship quite like theirs.
“He’s willing to help me; I’m willing to help him,” Pline said.

Angela Voit
Russ Pline (left) and Jason Saros (right) have fun in between class.

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